Indiana University political science professor Aaron Dusso talks to Ripon College students, faculty and friends about his research identifying correlations between personality types and one’s propensity to back candidates or issues that don’t agree with his or her self-interest.
Indiana University political science professor Aaron Dusso talks to Ripon College students, faculty and friends about his research identifying correlations between personality types and one’s propensity to back candidates or issues that don’t agree with his or her self-interest.

If you fancy yourself to be conscientious — an orderly, dependable and responsible person — you just may be a political hypocrite.

That is, you are more likely than those with other personality traits to vote for a candidate or party that does not favor your public-policy preferences.   

So says Indiana University political science professor Aaron Dusso, who spoke last week Thursday to a packed house at Kresge Little Theatre in Ripon College’s East Hall.

Dusso discussed the intersection of political psychology with citizen knowledge and democratic engagement. 

To identify the degree to which certain personalities fall victim to “political hypocrisy” — voting for people or parties who oppose their issue positions — he used the “Big Five” model of personality types. These include  extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability/neuroticism and openness to experiences.

Bearing in mind their personality, Dusso measured respondents’ “civic aptitude” by gaging their ability to understand and engage in five areas of civic life: drug testing welfare recipients, health insurance, same-sex marriage, energy policy and food stamps.

Read the full story, including Dusso's explanation of how psychology can be a "driver" of misinformation, in the Feb. 15, 2018 edition of the Ripon Commonwealth Press.