REP. GLENN GROTHMAN at the Little White Schoolhouse last April: “I think the tax reform plan is not going to pass, and I don’t think Donald Trump needs another thing that’s not going to be completed.”              						 Maic D’Agostino photo
REP. GLENN GROTHMAN at the Little White Schoolhouse last April: “I think the tax reform plan is not going to pass, and I don’t think Donald Trump needs another thing that’s not going to be completed.” Maic D’Agostino photo

“Maybe by cutting the tax rate we’ll get more jobs; maybe more income, maybe not.”
— Rep. Glenn Grothman speaking to an audience at Ripon College a year ago.

     Rep. Glenn Grothman, R-Glenbeulah, proved last week that he’s a betting man.

     Ripon’s congressman voted Thursday for a $1.5 trillion tax-relief bill that will either:

     a. Stimulate U.S. economic growth so as to whittle down the crushing national debt, or

     b. Bust the federal budget, blowing a staggering $1.5 to $2.2 trillion hole in the national debt over the next decade (sources: Joint Committee on Taxation and Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget respectively), leaving each American taxpayer with a more than $200,000 tab to pay for existing debt as well as the bill’s revenue loss and associated debt-service costs. This would bring the debt to more than 97 percent of GDP by 2027 (it was 31.7 percent in 1981).    

     Since Grothman is gambling with our money, it’s not unreasonable for us to ask him to raise his own stakes.

     If he’s right and the net tax revenue increase exceeds the cost, we’ll vote for him a year from now to serve a third term.

     And if he’s wrong?

     He returns to West Bend and lets someone else decide how to invest the earnings of hard-working Sixth District residents.  
So how about it, Rep. Grothman? Care to take us up on our wager? ...

     Given your words at a Ripon chamber forum last April in the Little White Schoolhouse, this probably is a safe bet for you. You confessed that “I think the tax reform plan is not going to pass, and I don’t think Donald Trump needs another thing that’s not going to be completed.”

     So under the terms of this bet, if your prediction bears out that the tax plan won’t even be enacted, you won’t have to step down.

     Unless your constituents tire of empty rhetoric and fiscal malpractice by their recklessly partisan career politician.  
                                                   — Tim Lyke

To read the entire editorial, see the Nov. 23, 2017 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.