POLITICAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR Matt Grossman points out the Republicans often tend to disappoint their base because they fail to ever cut the size of government. Hence, creation of some intra-party groups such as the Tea Party and the Freedom Caucus. 								      Tim Lyke photo
POLITICAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR Matt Grossman points out the Republicans often tend to disappoint their base because they fail to ever cut the size of government. Hence, creation of some intra-party groups such as the Tea Party and the Freedom Caucus. Tim Lyke photo

     In describing how the political parties operate in an asymmetrical way ...  political scientist Matt Grossman made an interesting observation unique to Republicans.  

     The Michigan State University professor told a Ripon College audience last week that GOP partisans tend to send people to Washington, D.C. only to be disappointed that they “go native.” Most common criticism is that they become so comfortable in the swamp that they compromise their ideological purity by breaking their promises to scale back the size and scope of government.  

     Nowhere is this wholesale fire sale on Republicans’ principles greater than in the area of the mounting national debt they consistently promise but even more consistently fail to reverse. (To be fair, despite their hypocrisy their intentions are noble; Democrats generally don’t even pretend to champion fiscal responsibility.)

     Case in point: GOP lawmakers and President Trump’s efforts to pass tax reform that promises to add more to the $20 trillion debt with which we have saddled our children and grandchildren.

     In the rush to help Trump finally draw a hash mark in the win column, Republicans are offering a plan that could mean up to $1.5 trillion in lost revenue over the next decade.

     ... Remember when Republicans used to at least pretend to be fiscally conservative?

     ... Current Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin argues Trump’s tax-reform plan will carve $1 trillion from the debt due to the growth of a stimulated economy. Same song America has heard, just a new soloist. Mnuchin’s claim, by the way, was made in response to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget’s estimate that the tax plan will reduce revenue by $2.2 trillion over 10 years.

     So immediate political points are being traded for America’s further fiscal decline; orthodoxy is easily shucked when deemed unpopular to an unprincipled president whose ratings remain in the cellar. ...

    The swamp’s getting deeper.
                                   — Tim Lyke

To read the entire editorial, see the Oct. 12, 2017 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.