Column: Schultz plays musical matchmaker to area students, teachers

ADAM SCHULTZ PLAYS a piano with his nephew, London Radke. submitted photo

SAY YOU’RE HOPING to play the ukelele. How do you find a teacher to help you learn your new talent?

Or, how about you’re that music teacher. How do you go about finding that student?

... Sometimes, connecting the right music teacher to the right music student isn’t the easiest exercise.

That idea is compounded if you’re a new music teacher, just hoping to break into the biz.

Sure, everyone knows the same two or three teachers around town. And in a business where word-of-mouth can be key, that can make starting off as a music teacher that much more difficult.

A former Ripon resident (and Ripon native) is hoping to change that dynamic.

Adam Schultz has created a website — www.riponmusiclessons.com — that aims to create connections between prospective teachers and interested students as easy to make as a click of the mouse.

THOUGH ADAM RECENTLY moved to Illinois for a job, the story still begins (and ends) right in Ripon.

“I took piano lessons from a young age from a few different teachers in Ripon,” Schultz said. “... Making music has been a huge part of my life. I’ve played for many weddings and events not to mention just playing and singing with my kids. And I’ve tried to pass on my love of making music by giving lessons ...

“I really started having fun with music when I started taking lessons from Jan Saecker in Markesan when I was about 14, I think. With Jan, I started to learn to play pop music and to improvise. It was a side of making music I had never experienced and for me it was a great fit.”

FOR ADAM, THAT EXPERience was partly about the student connecting with just the right teacher.

He hopes his website can help others do the same.

“As a parent, or an older student, finding the right teacher isn’t as easy as just finding a teacher,” Adam said. “Some parents want their kids on a strict, classical learning style. Some just want their kids to be exposed to music and to have fun.”

Sure, there are websites on a national level that enable teachers and students make this connection.

“The main problem with the nationwide sites is that none of them have a wide selection of local teachers on board,” Adam said. “I was frustrated at how difficult it was to do something so simple: [to] let the community know I give lessons. Or as a parent, to get a nice list of the local teachers. I want to talk to different teachers to determine who will be the best fit for my child.”

Out of this frustration, his website was born. ...

To read the entire column, see the Oct. 24, 2013 edition of The Ripon Commonwealth Press.

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